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If Brexit, Whither EMA?

Posted by Peter J. Pitts on 7/14/16 9:00 AM

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If Brexit, whither EMA?

Will Great Britain become like Norway and Iceland, attending committees such as the CHMP, where their views and votes are not of the same standing as those of members of the EU, or choose to follow a different route? There’s a lot at stake for the future of the MHRA and the British public health.

But what about the impact of removing MHRA expertise from EMA?
According to “Perplexit,” by BioCentury’s Steve Usdin, there’s a lot for EMA to worry about. “Since the start of EMA, MHRA has been a major supplier of resources and scientific expertise,” former EMA Executive Director Thomas Lönngren told BioCentury.

Of the 3,678 scientific experts listed in an EMA database, 281, or 8%, are from the U.K. “Taking a leading role in providing scientific and regulatory advice at the European level is a position the agency is familiar with and has maintained this year,” MHRA stated in its 2015 annual report. The U.K. drug regulator noted that in 2014-15 it was given 166 appointments to coordinate CHMP Scientific Advice Working Parties, a figure which represented “the highest number of any member state and reflects the high regard in which the agency’s scientific and regulatory expertise is held.”

MHRA also continued to “have the highest number of rapporteur/corapporteur appointments in Europe” in 2014-15. The agency said the workload is an acknowledgement of the “widely respected knowledge of the MHRA and its assessment processes.”

Since EMA’s creation, MHRA officials have served as rapporteurs for 16.5% of CHMP assessments and as co-rapporteurs for 10% of assessments.
MHRA experts have played a major role in pharmacovigilance assessments, serving as rapporteurs or co-rapporteurs for 29% of Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) safety investigations.

In addition to leading assessments of applications submitted under EMA’s centralized procedure, the U.K. and MHRA are a top choice for companies using the decentralized procedure to obtain marketing authorizations in several EU countries.

Applicants can select a reference member state (RMS) for decentralized authorizations. In 2014-15 the U.K. “remained the preferred RMS responsible for leading on 195 (45%) of all procedures in which the U.K. was involved,” according to the MHRA annual report.

The U.K. agency has taken a leading position in developing EMA regulatory policies, BioIndustry Association CEO Steve Bates told BioCentury. He cited initiatives to revamp the clinical trials directive into a regulation that will facilitate multisite, multinational trials, EMA’s policies on advanced therapies such as gene and cellular therapies, and the PRIority MEdicines (PRIME) initiative, EMA’s version of FDA’s breakthrough therapies program.

Whatever arrangement is negotiated, a Brexit will likely force EMA and its 890 employees to leave its base in London’s Canary Wharf. EMA employs 60 British nationals, and about 10% of its management positions are held by Brits.
 
With EMA moving to the continent, and MHRA’s loss of status within EMA, will pharmaceutical companies to move their regulatory hubs out of the U.K. To do otherwise, according to Grant Castle, a partner in the London office of the law firm Covington & Burling, “would be like having European marketing authorizations maintained by staff in the U.S., Switzerland or Japan.”
 
Warsaw here we come?

Topics: Pharmaceutical Industry, Regulatory